At Home: PCM & Beltline Update, Atlanta’s Architecture, and Low Impact Landscapes

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Photo courtesy of Serenbe Soul & Style

8 thoughts on “At Home: PCM & Beltline Update, Atlanta’s Architecture, and Low Impact Landscapes”


  1. Noticed they were putting up the big “Ponce City Market” sign on the Ponce side of the building today. Very much in keeping with the style of the building – including a clock at the bottom of the sign.

  2. “But how will the development be received by local residents, and what effect will it have on local businesses? Detractors say Ponce City Market is a sign of the City Too Busy To Hate turning into the City Too Busy To Relate.”

    Can someone explain what this is supposed to mean? To me, it seems to be relating awfully well — to history, to the area’s future economic prospects and relevance, to recreation and the social life of the city and, especially if light rail ever joins the Beltline, to the reduction of sprawl. “To Busy to Relate” to what?

    1. That quip confused me too, but I assume it was alluding to the high rents and pricey restaurants going in there. Recently, I had a discussion with an O4W resident who was unhappy with PCM and the developer. He compared it to their project in NYC, Chelsea Market, which he blamed for out-of-control gentrification in Chelsea. We didn’t get a chance to continue the discussion, but I wanted to ask him if it wasn’t in fact the Beltline that is largely responsible for the gentrification in that area, more so than PCM.

      1. Interesting. I always get a bit annoyed at that line of thinking because it suggests that the alternative to a pricey PCM would be a not-so-pricey PCM, when the truth of the matter (as was demonstrated over many, many, many years) is that the alternative is disinvestment, neglect and a former jewel of the area falling into further and further decline. Projects of such enormous magnitude come with a hefty price tag and, if we’re not going to accomplish it through the public sector (which could have been quite interesting with very different outcomes), we need to bow to the realities of getting it done privately. Chelsea Market’s not a direct comparison, IMO, because its start-up costs were so much less. It could have been much more realistically programmed in a way that catered to a wider swath of the neighborhood.

        Also, Beltline: Yes.

      2. “out-of-control gentrification”

        So this is code for “too many rich people,” I guess?

        At any rate, I looked over PCM’s tenant roster, and I guess you’d call it upscale, but hardly beyond the reach of the sainted middle class. It includes Juice Box, Chai Pani, and Dancing Goats. Cheap, no. But not exactly a dinner out at Rathbun Steak, either. And let’s face it, the same people complaining that PCM is to upscale would be just as vocally opposed if it included an Applebee’s.

        1. “And let’s face it, the same people complaining that PCM is to upscale would be just as vocally opposed if it included an Applebee’s.”

          Fair point. The O4W resident I talked to was complaining about rents in the area though, not the retail mix (rereading it, my comment might have implied otherwise).

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