Church Street Gets Its Own Spread in June Issue of Southern Living

southern living

Chris points out that Church Street is featured in the June Issue of Southern Living.  Can’t find any link for it yet, so here’s a photo of the page from the magazine.  Homegrown, Houndstooth Road, Leon’s, Green’s and Paper Plane all get a mention!

28 thoughts on “Church Street Gets Its Own Spread in June Issue of Southern Living”


      1. I hate correcting grammar, and I hate having my grammar corrected. But sometimes I just can’t help myself. Thanks for being a good sport.

    1. oh all right, while you’re at it you can change “can’t find any link for a yet” to “can’t find any link for it yet.”

            1. This reminds me of a scene in Finding Forrester:

              Forrester: Paragraph three starts…with a conjunction, “and.” You should never start a sentence with a conjunction.
              Jamal: Sure you can.
              Forrester: No, it’s a firm rule.
              Jamal: No, it was a firm rule. Sometimes using a conjunction at the start of a sentence makes it stand out. And that may be what the writer’s trying to do.
              Forrester: And what is the risk?
              Jamal: Well the risk is doing it too much. It’s a distraction. And it could give your piece a run-on feeling. But for the most part, the rule on using “and” or “but” at the start of a sentence is pretty shaky. Even though it’s still taught by too many professors. Some of the best writers have ignored that rule for years, including you.

  1. 12 responses and they all focus on grammar?!?!??! Who are you people?

    I think it’s way cool that Church Street gets a shout out from Southern Living — it’s a great street and it deserves the recognition.

    1. “12 responses and they all focus on grammar?!?!??! Who are you people?”

      We’re a bunch of pedants who live for finding and correcting grammatical errors. We also enjoy ignoring the whole point of the original post, and increasing the count of unrelated comments. 🙂

    1. Sez you. May the Oxford comma forever be a source of disagreement, debate and discussion.

      1. You mean you’re glad to give us all something we can agree upon.
        We can keep going longer than you can and we have you outnumbered, anyway.

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